Old and new coins of Saudi Arabia


The official currency of the country of the two mosques (as Saudi Arabia is often called) is riyal. Possessing fabulous gold collateral, the Saudi riyal from the first days began to be converted into foreign currency. The loose change riyal is called halal. One siala contains 100 halalas. It was possible to exchange one riyal in 100, 50, 25, 10 and 5 halal coins

The official currency of the country of the two mosques (as Saudi Arabia is often called) is riyal. Possessing fabulous gold collateral, the Saudi riyal from the first days began to be converted into foreign currency.

The loose change riyal is called halal. One siala contains 100 halalas. It was possible to exchange one riyal in 100, 50, 25, 10 and 5 halal coins. To date, the 100 halal coin has been withdrawn from circulation.

Coins of Saudi Arabia. History reference

The first coins, which appeared in use by Arabians at the beginning of the last century (more precisely, in 1928), were called kirschs. At the same time, metallic money worth one rial, half riyal and a quarter riyal was minted. Each coin contained 19.96 grams of pure silver.

Until 1932, the design of the coins was unchanged - on both sides loomed a circle of dots, and next to it were inscriptions in Arabic. On the reverse indicated the denomination of the coin. The lower part of the obverse was occupied by the emblem of Saudi Arabia. From 1932 to 1935, the diameter of the silver rial decreased, and in 1935 its design also changed. The name of the country appeared on a small silver riyal and its small money (worth of rial and quarter riyal). A year later, the amount of silver contained in these coins was reduced to 10.69 grams.

From pure gold ...

In October 1952, a coin completely new to Saudi Arabia was minted (photo in the article) - sovereign. This gold coin was not inferior to the English sovereign (both coins contain 7.98805 grams of gold). In the same year, King Abdul-Aziz Al Saud became the founder of the official State Monetary Agency, and the riyal received the status of a national currency.

At the end of the 50s of the last century, coins of 4 and 2 kirsha appeared (they were minted from a copper-nickel alloy), and after another six years halals were introduced.

At the beginning of the 60s, a new coin of Saudi Arabia appeared - 1 halal, and a decade later, the Arabians set up production of other halal values. All of them were minted from an alloy of nickel and copper.

Beginning of the oil era

The beginning of the oil “fever” contributed to the strengthening and popularization of rial: in the 70s of the last century, Saudi Arabia went down in history as the largest oil state.

Today, the country of two mosques is among the richest countries on the planet, and its national currency has acquired global significance. The reason is not only in the scale of oil production. Currently, Saudi Arabia drew attention to the item of income, which was previously considered not serious. We are talking about the tourism business, which has made this country even more popular and rich.

At the very end of the last century, the manufacture of bimetallic money in denominations of 1 rial began, and at the beginning of 2007 50 halal minted. The name of Abdullah, the Saudi King, is inscribed on this coin of Saudi Arabia. In September of the same year, it was announced that the Saudi state would not be economically dependent on the US dollar exchange rate.

This event did not happen immediately. At the end of 2009, the exchange rate of the national Saudi currency against the dollar was 3.75 riyal, and Saudi bankers bought dollars at 3.74 rial. Buying one dollar cost the Arabians 3.77 riyal.

Today, in the turnover of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, there are coins of one rial, as well as 50, 25, 10, and 5 halal. Old money - kurushi (kirshi) - until withdrawn from circulation, but are quite rare.

The numismatic value of Saudi coins. Opinion collectors

At the numismatic auction today you can purchase sets of coins of Saudi Arabia. For example:

  • a set of seven coins minted in 2016, sold for 711 rubles. These include coins of 1 and 2 real, 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 halal;
  • a set of five Saudi coins worth 173 rubles. This set includes metal money in denominations of 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 halal, which were minted from 1977 to 2010.
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